Tips for Making a Move Easier

Let There Be Light: 5 Tips for Packing & Moving Chandeliers

Posted by on 7-07-15 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Let There Be Light: 5 Tips for Packing & Moving Chandeliers

The right chandelier can look breathtaking in the foyer of your home, and many homeowners have spent a lot of time to find “the one.” Unfortunately, most Americans also tend to move once every 5 years, and it can be difficult to part with the chandelier at times. So, don’t worry; these 5 tips will get you started and on the right path. Remove Light Bulbs and Detachable Parts & Pack Them Separately Light bulbs and detachable parts can easily come apart during the move, as they are particularly fragile and delicate. It’s best to store them separately in labeled corrugated cardboard boxes. Remove each bulb and wrap it carefully in bubble wrap, tissue paper or newspaper. You’ll also find many of the chains and candle cups are detachable. Wrap each detachable part separately as well. If the design of your chandelier looks rather complicated and complex, you may want to stick a note on each part with details on how you removed it. This will ensure everything goes back to its rightful place. Secure the Cords with Tie Wraps or Rubber Bands—Not Tape The electricity cords are also prone to wear and are vulnerable to becoming damaged during the move, as they can get snagged onto hooks or become tangled. One wrong move and the cords could snap or fray. To prevent this from happening, wrap the cords around your hands and secure them with tie wraps or rubber bands. Never wrap the cords with tape. It’s a common mistake that many homeowners make. The adhesive glue on the tape could transfer onto the cords causing them to become a sticky mess.   Pack the Chandelier Standing Upright and Fill with Packing Peanuts Once you have everything else packed and ready to go, it’s time to pack the base and foundation of the chandelier. Due to the design, the base tends to be heavier, so stand the chandelier upright in a box. Get someone else to fill in all of the gaps with packing peanuts that will absorb impact and prevent damages. If you’re really concerned about the chandelier getting scratched up, wrap the chandelier in bubble wrap before placing it in its box. You want to be particularly careful with where the different parts come together. These joints tend to be most fragile and delicate. One wrong move and you could end up snapping a part of the chandelier off. Secure the Chandelier Using Nylon Loading Straps The chandelier can be quite heavy, and you definitely don’t want it to be tossed around in the moving truck when it comes to a turn or if it abruptly stops. Move professional moving trucks will have hooks coming out of the sides of the truck. You could tie nylon loading straps there to secure everything in place. In this situation, you want to make sure the box containing the chandelier is secure and won’t budget even a bit. Pack the Chandelier on Top of Everything Else Because of the fragile nature of the chandelier, don’t use it as a base when packing even if it may be heavy. You don’t want any extra weight to come crashing down. Instead, pack the chandelier on top of everything else if possible. You need to be extremely detail-oriented when moving a chandelier,...

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Tips For Moving Your Refrigerator

Posted by on 6-06-15 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Tips For Moving Your Refrigerator

Moves are stressful, and this is even true if you are just moving down the street or a few miles away. There are a few things you can do to reduce your stress. Hiring movers to take care of moving all of your packed boxes and furniture items is a good idea, and so is moving some of your more important items a few days or a few weeks before the big move date. This is an especially good idea if you intend on spending most of your time in the new home as you go about the moving process. You may want to move your refrigerator sooner than later if you want to cook and eat as a family in the new space. If you have a pickup truck or a small moving van you can use for a few days, then follow the tips below to make sure you complete the task properly. Remove All the Perishable Foods The first thing you need to do before moving your refrigerator from one house to another is to pack all perishable food items into coolers. If you have mostly cleaned out the refrigerator, then think about purchasing a 28 or 54 quart cooler. If your refrigerator and freezer are both full, then think about buying at least two 66, 77, 120, or 150 quart coolers. Many coolers are made from either a polyethylene material or stainless steel. Stainless steel models look more durable, buy polyethylene is actually a better option because it resists dents, dings, and other damage.  When buying the coolers, find ones with thick rubber gaskets on the top and tight latches on the front to keep cold air from escaping. Also, look for cooler models that indicate that ice will stay cool for somewhere between three and five days. Once you have the coolers, pack each cooler with regular ice along the bottom and sides. Place the food items from the refrigerator inside the cooler and close the lid. Keep the lid closed as much as possible to keep the foods cold. Storing Frozen Foods After the refrigerator items are secured, purchase some dry ice from your local grocery store. You will likely need about 10 or 20 pounds of the ice to keep items frozen for at least one day, so buy this amount. Use gloves to protect your hands and place the ice in the bottom of the other cooler. Set the frozen items on top of the dry ice. Make sure that that the packing, along with unpacking, of the cooler is completed in a well ventilated area. This is ideal, because dry ice releases carbon dioxide into the air as it sublimates. Moving the Fridge Once the refrigerator is cleared of all food items, set it outside in the sun for several hours until the ice in the freezer fully melts. If you have an older refrigerator, then the refrigerator itself needs to defrost too. Keep the freezer and refrigerator doors open so the ice will melt more quickly. If you are in a hurry, you can use the ice scraper for your car to force the ice out of the freezer. A blow drier can offer assistance too, just make sure to keep the device two feet or more away from the freezer door to...

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2 Things You Need To Think About Before Choosing A Storage Unit Lock

Posted by on 4-04-15 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

When you rent a storage unit, you might be tempted to dig an old lock out of your kitchen junk drawer and slap it on your door. After all, why wouldn’t you use what you already have, especially if it saves you a few bucks? Unfortunately, not all padlocks are created equally, which could leave you in a bind later. Here are two things you need to think about before choosing a storage unit lock, so that you can keep your unit secure: 1: The Shackle If you were going to cut a padlock off of a storage unit, which part of the lock would you target first? Although you might assume that robbers would try to drill a hole through the keyhole or pry open the lock body, the shackle is usually the weakest part of any padlock. This long, cylindrical bar is the portion of the lock that opens and closes when you turn your key or enter your code, and some are much easier to target than others. Here are a few different shackle types you might come across, and how to choose the right version: Long Shackle: Some shackles are long, U-shaped bars that extend out from a solid-looking lock body. Unfortunately, the easier the shackle is to access, the faster it can be cut with a pair of bolt cutters. Protected Body: To keep that shackle safe, some locks contain a large metal casing around the shackle. If a thief wants to target these locks, they have to contend with the solid metal body before they can cut through the shackle. Because these locks take longer to cut off, they can help you to deter theft.   Disc Lock: If you really want to make things hard for a criminal, consider investing in a disc lock. In addition to containing a protected shackle, the entire lock is shaped like a smooth, circular disc—which makes it hard to grip with a grinder. Before you purchase a lock, take the time to inspect the hasp of your storage unit door. Some hasps contain a small amount of clearance, which might make it hard to use a disc or protected body lock. 2: Weather Resistance Are you planning on leaving your things in storage for a while? Over time, wind, moisture, and dust can corrode padlocks, which could make your unit less secure. Fortunately, lock manufacturers have developed a series of protective coverings, so that you can keep the elements from affecting the structural integrity of your device. Here are a few features you should look for: Powder Coating: Iron is an incredibly strong element, but unfortunately, it can rust quickly when it is exposed to water and oxygen. However, some locks are powder coated to protect them from corrosion. During powder coating, resins are electrostatically applied to metal, and then the lock is baked to create a smooth, even coating. In addition to protecting the surface of your lock, powder coating is available in several colors, so that you can make your storage unit easier to find. Protective Rubber Covers: Metal locks can also be subjected to tensile stress from being banged around, which can result in structural cracks. To protect your lock, some devices contain rubber covers, which absorb impact. Keyhole Cover: If your storage unit...

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Renting A Storage Unit? 2 Ways To Keep Your Things Safe And Sound

Posted by on 4-04-15 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If you are planning on renting a storage unit to hold your things for a while, you might be more concerned about the monthly rental price tag than you are about protecting your things. Unfortunately, unless you take the right steps beforehand, you might return to find a few unpleasant surprises later. Here are two ways to keep your things safe and sound, so that you don’t have to deal with hassles later: 1: Find The Right Lock A lock is a lock, right? Not so much. Some locks are much easier to cut off than others, which could make your unit a target for a thief. Although storage facilities are generally safe, with only 8.9% of facilities reporting any type of theft in 2012, you should do everything you can to make your unit rock-solid. Here are three types of padlocks you might have to choose from, and how to pick the best one for your unit: Long Shackle: Some padlocks contain a long, thin shackle, which makes it easy to maneuver and use on complicated door hasps. However, the more accessible the shackle, the easier it might be for a thief to clip it with a pair of bolt cutters. Disc Lock: Because smooth, round surfaces are difficult to grip with a handsaw or electric grinder, disc locks tend to be very secure. The entire body of the lock is enclosed in a strong, metal disc-shaped lock, which also protects the shackle. Also, because disc locks aren’t spring loaded and you actually move the shackle in place when you turn the key, they are also impossible to close without completely securing the lock. Closed Shackle: If you want the best of both worlds, look for a lock with a closed shackle. These padlocks contain a long, rectangular body encased in a tamper-proof box. Unfortunately, because the shackle clearance is kept to a minimum, these locks won’t fit on every door hasp. Before you choose a lock for your storage unit, carefully weigh your patience level with your need for security. If you want a lock that is easy to snap on an off and you aren’t storing expensive goods, a long shackle lock might be right for you. On the other hand, if you don’t mind maneuvering a difficult door hasp and you need to keep your unit safe and sound, a closed shackle or disc lock might work better.  2: Inspect Your Unit Unfortunately, robberies aren’t the only bad thing that can happen to your storage space. If bugs or bad weather are allowed into your unit, you might return to find damaged items. Fortunately, you might be able to fend off trouble by thoroughly inspecting your unit beforehand. Here are a few things you should check for: Incoming Light: To check for missing weather stripping and holes in the walls, visit storage units during the day, close the door, and look for incoming light. If you can see sunshine, wind and moisture could whip through your unit and cause damage.    Floor Cracks: Cracks in cement floors could indicate ground movement or structural problems. Also, cracked, heaved surfaces could make it harder to load boxes and furniture into your storage space.  Evidence of Prior Pests: Look around the unit for dead bugs, rodent droppings, and animal...

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